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The Shinyokohama Ramen Museum

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It was 1958, and we were hungry. Luckily, we were near Narutabashi Station, where there are at least a dozen ramen shops to choose from. We sat down to big bowls of steaming noodles, and talked about the news of the day… Khrushchev seems a reasonable new leader for the Soviets, doesn’t he? Then my cellphone rang and I remembered: this isn’t 1958. And there is no train station called Narutabashi. The year was 2014 and we were inside Shinyokohama’s Ramen Museum.

Shinyokohama Ramen Museum

The Ramen Museum’s claim to the word “museum” is tenuous at best. On the top floor there’s some information about the history of ramen, but most visitors skip right by this. No, the reason for this museum’s considerable popularity is its restaurants. On the lower two floors, twelve excellent ramen shops are spread across a setting meant to evoke the year 1958, when the dish was invented.

In essence, the Ramen Museum is nothing more than a food court, but it’s a great food court. We had a blast walking around the fake neighborhood, looking at the old movie posters and photographs, buying sweets at the candy shop, and watching classic wrestling on a TV found in one of the house windows. The attention to detail was impressive. There was even a guy in uniform calling out fake train schedules.

After taking a couple laps, we decided to eat at a shop called Nidai-me Genkotsu-ya, where we enjoyed big helpings of ramen in a rich, golden broth. As we were slurping down our noodles, we noticed that most of the other patrons were ordering small bowls; they were probably planning on sampling variations at the different shops, and we kicked ourselves for not doing the same.

The museum costs ¥300 to enter, and then you have to pay for your ramen, normally around ¥800 for a bowl. The Ramen Museum is a strange place and not incredibly easy to reach from Tokyo (halfway to the city of Yokohama), but we had a lot of fun here… and a great lunch.

Location on our Map

Buy Ramen Noodles Online

Shinyokohama Ramen Museum
Shinyokohama Ramen Museum
Shinyokohama Ramen Museum
Shinyokohama Ramen Museum
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July 8, 2014 at 2:09 pm Comments (3)

The Seedy Pleasures of East Shinjuku

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We had seen a lot of Tokyo’s different faces: cute, modern, weird, beautiful, historic, confusing. But until our visit to East Shinjuku, we hadn’t experienced the famously seedy side of Tokyo. The Golden Gai, Kabukicho and Piss Alley are three areas which forever changed our impression of the city. (A change for the better? I’ll leave that unanswered.)

Seedy Pleasures of East Shinjuku

It’s surprising that Tokyo’s seediest area is so near the administrative offices and corporate skyscrapers of West Shinjuku. But even as I’m writing that sentence, I’m thinking that, actually, it’s not so surprising at all. Politicians and corporate moneymen, after all, aren’t exactly celebrated for their puritanical rejection of all things seedy. Rather, the opposite.

With flashing neon lights, narrow alleys, sketchy bars, drunk people of indeterminate gender, pachinko halls, and musty smells emanating from dark alleys, East Shinjuku is a sailor’s dream. “Want you pretty lady? Want you drug?” There are underground bars which expressly forbid foreigners from entering, and places I’d never enter even if I were allowed. You’re thinking, “I’m sure it can’t be all that crazy.” But then you do some research and learn: yes, it can.

Golden Gai
Seedy Pleasures of East Shinjuku

We began our Saturday evening tour of East Shinjuku at the Golden Gai, a small and compact sub-neighborhood packed with ramshackle two-story houses. There are six small alleys criss-crossing the Golden Gai, all connected by even smaller alleys barely wide enough for a person to squeeze through. Nearly every building has two bars, one at street level and one on the second floor; there must be over a hundred drinking establishments here. The Golden Gai offers an architectural glimpse into the recent past of Tokyo, before skyscrapers and modern apartment buildings began replacing the older homes.

Despite the shabby, almost slum-like condition of the area, this is an expensive place to drink, and unwelcoming to foreigners. Its bars cater to a well-off Japanese clientele, and are popular among artists and intellectuals. Often, you have to be a “regular” before you’re even allowed in. We wanted to grab a beer, but felt like intruders every time we poked our heads into a bar. And so we left, not wanting to impose.

Kabukicho
Seedy Pleasures of East Shinjuku

Walking to the northeast, we entered the neighborhood of Kabukicho (“Kabuki District”). Following the 1945 firebombing, the city wanted to establish a new theater in Shinjuku. Although the plan was never realized, the name has endured. And who cares if there’s never been Kabuki in Kabukicho? There are plenty of other ways to entertain yourself here.

Kabukicho is Tokyo’s non-stop party zone. The reigning red-light district in the world’s craziest city. It’s sensory overload from the moment you enter, until whatever early-morning hour you manage to straggle out. Kabukicho is aggressive about its fun, and you’ll need a thick skin to resist the pleasures being proffered by every neon advertisement, and by the sketchy guys on every corner.

One such pleasure is offered by the glamorous boys of Kabukicho’s host clubs. These are clubs for women who want the companionship and attention of attractive young men. Ladies pay exorbitant amounts to sit on the sofa with their preferred boys. Nothing too sordid goes on. The hosts will listen to the women talk, tell them jokes to make them laugh, compliment them, maybe hug them when appropriate. It’s a fascinating phenomenon, and the subject of an excellent documentary called The Great Happiness Space.

Piss Alley
Seedy Pleasures of East Shinjuku

After having had enough fun in Kabukicho, we crossed the train tracks and arrived at the foot of a picturesque street sloping gently downward, illuminated by paper lanterns and filled with people seated on stools at yakitoris, or grill joints. It looked like a scene straight out of the 1920s and, indeed, the alley’s name is “Memory Lane.” That’s a lot more romantic than the name by which most locals know it: “Piss Alley.”

In years past, this alley was a place in which to get smashed. People would come to the bars, drink themselves into oblivion, and relieve themselves in the street. Today, “Piss Alley” has cleaned up its act, and is home to an unbroken lineup of restaurants which specialize in various sorts of grilled meat. Even if there’s the occasional rogue tinkler (and I’m sure there is), the smell of urine is no match for the clouds of smoke wafting from every open window.

Locations on our Map: Golden Gai | Kabukicho | Piss Alley

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Random Shinjuku Photos
Seedy Pleasures of East Shinjuku
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More Photos From the Piss Alley
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July 6, 2014 at 6:40 am Comments (4)

The Studio Ghibli Museum

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Since releasing Castle in the Sky in 1986, the magicians of Studio Ghibli have come to dominate the world of Japanese animation. Spirited Away, Porco Rosso, Howl’s Moving Castle, and The Wind Rises are just some of the studio’s feature films, nearly all of which have been hailed by critics and beloved by audiences the world over. We’ve been Ghibli fans for years, and made it a point to visit the studio’s museum in Inokashira Park.

Studio Ghibli

The museum is exactly what you’d expect from Studio Ghibli. It’s as though one of the eccentric buildings in their films has come to life. A hybrid between theme park, science museum and behind-the-scenes studio tour, the museum is beautiful, with every detail thoughtfully designed, from the tickets to the faucet taps. Fans are going to be in heaven.

Unfortunately, there’s a strict “no photos” policy inside the museum, so we weren’t able to photograph any of the interior rooms, but believe me: they’re all stunning. We were impressed right off the bat; in the very first room, there’s a three-dimensional zoetrope featuring the characters of My Neighbor Totoro. As a strobe light flashes, the stage spins backwards and hundreds of miniature sculptures jump into life.

As you wind your way through the museum, characters from the world of Ghibli walk you through the creation process of the studio’s movies, starting with conception and design, before moving on to the first watercolor sketches and detailed story boards. Hands-on exhibits allow you to page through entire animated screenplays, or spin film through a reel to project an image against the wall.

Studio Ghibli

During our visit, the museum was excruciatingly crowded, which is no real surprise considering Ghibli’s popularity in Japan and around the world. But you can escape the crowds inside by going to the rooftop garden, where a life-sized Laputa robot from Castle in the Sky is stationed. Or you can take a break and enjoy home-cooking at the Straw Hat Café… if you manage to get a seat. You probably won’t.

The best part of the museum might be the Saturn Theater on the ground floor, where you have the chance to see a short animated feature created exclusively for the museum. There are about ten different films in total, but you only get to see one. Ours was called The Day I Bought a Star. It was all in Japanese with no subtitles, but still understandable and just as enchanting as everything produced by Ghibli.

Gaining admission to the Ghibli Museum isn’t as simple as showing up and approaching the gates. You have to buy tickets at least a week in advance. If you’re in Japan, you can only do this at a Lawson convenience store. The machines are all in Japanese, but with luck (or persistence) you can get one of the staff to help. If you’re overseas, there are other methods of advance purchasing; check the Ghibli Museum’s guide for details.

So should you make the effort to visit the museum? Buying tickets is tricky, and it’s not all that easy to reach. But if you’re already a fan of Studio Ghibli’s films, this might turn out to be one of your favorite memories from Tokyo.

Location on our Map

Buy Studio Ghibli Movie Sets Here

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July 5, 2014 at 6:12 am Comments (4)

In and Around Tokyo Midtown

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It surely won’t keep the title for long but the tallest habitable building in Tokyo is currently the Midtown Tower, part of the Tokyo Midtown complex in Akasaka. We spent a day checking out the sights around Midtown, including the National Art Center and the tranquil Nogi Shrine.

Midtown Tokyo

Built in 2007 for over three billion dollars, the mixed-use Tokyo Midtown complex provides office space for leading firms like Xerox, Cisco and Yahoo! Japan, as well as residential apartments for (it seems safe to assume) the ultra-rich. In addition, it’s home to the five-story Galleria Mall, the Suntory Museum of Art and Issey Miyake’s 21_21 Design Sight workshop.

We spent a long time inside the Galleria Mall, walking into a number of shops… nothing which we could afford, of course, but there was some neat stuff. Along with stores selling clothing and household furnishings, there’s a vinoteca dedicated to the wines of Frances Ford Coppola. Even though we couldn’t shop, it was fun to be around such luxury, and one of Midtown’s best attractions is entirely free. Out back, in the shadow of the massive tower, is a gently sloping park that has soft grass, upon which hundreds of people were lying.

Midtown Tokyo

After resting in the park, we walked over to the nearby National Art Center, which also opened in 2007 and is among the largest art halls in Japan, with an ever-changing lineup of exhibits in its many rooms. But we were less interested in the art, than the architecture. The building, designed by Kisho Kurokawa, has a tilted, wave-shaped glass facade and an interior architecture that features huge, upside-down cones.

Midtown Tokyo

Further north along Gaien-Higashi-Dori, we came upon the Nogi Shrine. This is the former home of General Nogi, who served Emperor Meiji throughout his reign. The General had an illustrious career, with victories against both the Chinese and Russians, but today he’s most well-known for a demonstration of ultimate loyalty. A couple days following the death of the Emperor, both Nogi and his wife committed suicide in their home; she by throat-slitting, he by seppuku.

It’s a grisly story (and one I don’t find particularly “honorable”), but today the shrine and its adjoining park make for a peaceful escape from the noise and tawdry luxury of the upscale neighborhood surrounding it.

Locations on our Map: Tokyo Midtown | National Art Center | Nogi Shrine

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June 29, 2014 at 7:45 am Comments (0)

The Hara Museum of Contemporary Art

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Hidden away on the far side of Shinagawa, off an alley which cuts behind the Laforet Hotel, the Hara Museum of Contemporary Art is not the easiest place in the world to find. But tracking it down might be worth the effort, depending on which exhibition is currently showing.

Hara Museum Buffe

Founded in 1979, the museum occupies the former home of Kunizo Hara, one of pre-war Japan’s most important business magnates. Constructed in 1938 in the Bauhaus style, this is one of the few residential buildings from the early Showa Era still standing in Tokyo. It was a period during which Japan was looking west for inspiration and the European influence can certainly be seen in the museum’s architecture.

Although there are a few permanent exhibits, mostly by Japanese artists, the museum is known for its excellent temporary collections, of which there are around five per year. So your enjoyment of the museum will be entirely dependent on the quality of the current show. Check the official website before embarking on the trek to the Hara.

We were lucky enough to see The Dream of Polifilo, which is the work of Nicolas Buffe, a Parisian-born artist who became obsessed with Japanese pop culture early in life, and moved here years ago. Using the museum itself as part of his canvas, Buffe transformed the Hara into a multimedia adventure based on the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, one of the world’s earliest books, printed in 1499.

Location on our Map
Hara Museum of Contemporary Art – Website
Nicolas Buffe – Website

Framed Photos From Tokyo

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June 21, 2014 at 2:28 pm Comments (0)

The Historic Neighborhood of Fukagawa

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Across the Sumida River from Nihonbashi, Fukagawa is one of Tokyo’s original fifteen wards. We spent a day wandering around its uncrowded streets, allowing the district to surprise us with an excellent museum, a tranquil garden and, for lunch, a delicious bowl of the neighborhood specialty, Fukugawa Meshi.

Kiyosumi

Fukugawa is home to a few of Tokyo’s most acclaimed sumo stables. In fact, after emerging from the metro, the very first person we saw was a sumo wrestler, clad in a robe and large enough to blot out the sun. Like starstruck schoolgirls, we followed him at a discrete distance, watching as he went into a 7-11 to flip through comics. It’s not that I expect sumo wrestlers to constantly be eating or practicing, but it was somehow amusing to see this massive guy being so normal, just going about his day.

Kiyosumi

Next, we paid a small fee to enter the Kiyosumi Gardens, a 20-acre park with a circular path that leads along a pond, past a tea house, and through thousands of trees. The garden was created in the eighteenth century, and purchased in 1878 by Iwasaki Yataro, founder of the Mitsubishi Corporation, who intended to use it as a place of rest for his employees. Opened to the public in 1932, Kiyosumi is one of the more beautiful gardens we visited in Tokyo, thanks largely to an almost total lack of other tourists.

Kiyosumi

After leaving the garden, we walked a few blocks to the west and came upon the Fukagawa Edo Folk Museum. We weren’t sure what to expect here, but certainly not what we found: a full-scale reconstruction of Edo-era Fukagawa. This museum was a real surprise. Around eight houses have been built, some in cut-away to better show off the interiors, and others in their entirety. You’re allowed to remove your shoes and enter all of the buildings, both the residences and the stores. You can walk down by the canal (Fukagawa was an important port of Edo), look up at the fire tower, peer into the outdoor toilet shared by the entire neighborhood and see the roving soba vendor.

The museum is very permissive, allowing and even encouraging photographs, and visitors are free to handle any of the artifacts which are laying around. But the best part might be the dedicated volunteer staff, many of whom speak English, and all of whom are eager to answer questions you might have. The woman following us around was even answering questions we didn’t have.

By the time we finished in the museum, we were famished and set out to find lunch. While puzzling over the Japanese-only menu of a nearby restaurant, a group of older men clad in hiking gear stormed past us and into the door. The last one in line looked back and rubbed his belly as if to say, “yummy yummy”… and that’s as good a recommendation as you’re likely to get. We went up to the third floor, removed our shoes, sat down and dug into the neighborhood specialty: Fukagawa Meshi, a rice dish topped with a rich miso-based broth of clams and green onions.

Fukagawa doesn’t see a lot of foreign tourism, perhaps because it’s on the wrong side of the Sumida River. But this historic neighborhood is still quite central, easy to reach, and worth at least half a day. Probably more.

Locations on our Map: Kiyosumi Gardens | Edo Folk Museum | Meshi Restaurant

Our Apartment In Tokyo Was Very Close To This Neighborhood

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June 13, 2014 at 2:00 pm Comments (2)

The Tokyo Stock Exchange

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The world’s third-largest stock exchange is found in Tokyo, headquartered in the financial district of Nihonbashi. Guests are welcome to visit the complex, and watch the high-stakes action from a platform above the main trading floor.

Tokyo Stock Exchange

Thanks to the positioning of the International Date Line, the Tokyo Stock Exchange (often abbreviated to TSE) is the first major exchange to open every day, allowing Japan to set the pace of global finance. Founded in 1878, the TSE now lists stocks for over 2000 companies.

I know next to nothing about finance, or things like stocks, market capitalization, securities and industrial averages. Actually, I probably know less than nothing, since everything I think I know is probably wrong. As a financial nincompoop, visiting the TSE was intimidating. Like how an illiterate person feels when visiting a library. “What if I’m asked to define hedge funds? I’ll be exposed!”

Despite my ignorance, I enjoyed our trip to the TSE. After clearing security and donning visitor badges, we walked above the trading floor, which is enclosed within a massive glass cylinder. Around the glass, a large LED ticker has been installed, displaying transactions in real-time. There are also info points throughout the premises, where you can learn about the history of the exchange. We looked down onto the floor, watching numbers change and imagining the millions of yen being made and lost, and had the chance to play a Trading Simulation game.

We ended our tour at a small museum which has photographs from the early days of the exchange and takes just a few minutes to tour. Despite the stock exchange’s presence in downtown Tokyo and its considerable importance to the financial world, there were very few tourists inside with us. I suppose it’s something which only finance-freaks will really appreciate, but even for the rest of us, visiting is a worthwhile experience.

Location on our Map
TSE Arrows – Website

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June 12, 2014 at 1:34 pm Comments (0)

The Taimeiken Restaurant & Kite Museum

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Between the shopping mecca of Coredo Mall and the Tokyo Stock Exchange, we came across a quaint museum which feels completely out of place in modern Nihonbashi. The small and cluttered Kite Museum is hidden away without fanfare above Taimeiken, one of central Tokyo’s favorite restaurants.

Taimeiken Restaurant & Kite Museum

Kites were introduced to Japan in the eighth century by Buddhist monks from China, and have been a popular pastime ever since. At first, they were exclusively for religious festivals but soon had caught on among builders, who used them to hoist materials. Eventually, the general public realized they could be flown for fun. Today, each region of Japan has developed its own style of kite. The most traditional have spines made of bamboo, sturdy paper produced from a specific kind of mulberry tree, and hand-painted designs with vibrant colors.

Shingo Modegi, the owner of the Taimeiken Restaurant in Nihonbashi, was a lifelong kite enthusiast. By 1977, he had amassed thousands of models from around the world, and decided to open up his collection to the public. Thus was born the world’s first kite museum, found on the fifth floor above his restaurant.

Visiting the museum makes you feel as though you’re walking through the disorganized apartment of an eccentric old specialist… which, I suppose, is exactly what you’re doing. Hundreds of kites of all shapes and sizes line the walls, hang from the ceiling, or rest in glass cases. There are ancient models with paper so fragile it wouldn’t survive a light breeze, complicated kites resembling sailing ships, carp kites, samurai kites and, of course, plenty of dragon kites.

Taimeiken Restaurant & Kite Museum

After touring the museum, it makes sense to grab lunch downstairs in Taimeiken, famous for its omurice. Don’t worry if there’s a long line, and there almost certainly will be, because the place is large and the queue advances quickly.

Omurice is, as you might infer from its name, an omelette packed with rice; a meal inspired by western breakfasts. The house specialty is the “dandelion,” or tampopo omurice, which is a steaming omelette served atop chicken-fried rice. You’re meant to immediately cut open the softly-cooked eggs, allowing their bright yellow yolks to spread out and sink into the rice. It’s a dish both lovely and delicious, especially when topped with ketchup. That might sound strange, but it’s the suggested condiment, and goes perfectly with the dish.

Location on our Map

Indoor Kite

Taimeiken Restaurant & Kite Museum
Taimeiken Restaurant & Kite Museum
Taimeiken Restaurant & Kite Museum
Taimeiken Restaurant & Kite Museum
Taimeiken Restaurant & Kite Museum
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June 12, 2014 at 6:24 am Comment (1)

The Miraikan Future Science Museum

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We had a feeling that our visit to Odaiba Island’s Miraikan Future Science Museum was going to be awesome, and we were right. The only disappointment came when it closed, and we had to leave. Officially named the National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation, this is the most cutting-edge science museum we’ve ever visited.

Miraikan Museum Tokyo

Hanging from the ceiling in the foyer, the Geo-Cosmos globe welcomes visitors into the Miraikan. A Super-HD model of the Earth six meters in diameter, with organic LED panels that project over 10 million pixels, the Geo-Cosmos displays a rotating series of maps, from up-to-date global weather patterns, to topics like “Human Migration,” “Train Systems” and “Tuna Migrations.” It’s as absorbing as it is gorgeous, and we could easily have spent an hour on the lounge chairs in the foyer, watching it spin.

After tearing ourselves away from the globe, we toured exhibits dedicated to the International Space Station and the human genome. The museum is kid-friendly, but hasn’t been dumbed-down. There’s a hands-on model of the internet, for example, and an interactive room called “The Songs of Angura.” This is a fully immersive introduction to the science of Spatial Information. Kids can walk around playing with their “shadow-selves,” while adults can delve into supplemental material about creating digital space maps or the tracking of behavioral patterns.

The museum is usually crowded (this is Tokyo after all), but many of the exhibits ask you to take a number and assign you a time to return. It’s a great idea; when your time comes to play with the internet model, for example, you can do so in relative peace. And in the meantime, there are more than enough distractions.

One such distraction is provided by Honda’s famous robot, Asimo, who performs every hour in the museum. Initially, we found him adorable, this little humanoid tramping out onto the stage and waving at us. But as the demonstration progressed, I started to feel uneasy. Here was Asimo demonstrating how fast it could run, how it could jump, grab and throw, and all I could think was, “This thing could hunt me down and rip my head off, and there would be nothing I could do about it.” I’ve always known that the day would arrive on which we would bow before our robot masters, but in the Miraikan I realized how close it already is.

Before leaving, we went to the Miraikan’s dome theater for a 3D movie about the cosmos called Birthday. The 3D was top-notch, and truly created the illusion of diving into the Milky Way. I immediately wanted to watch it again, but we couldn’t. 5pm had rolled around and the museum was shutting down. We were ushered out… in the Japanese fashion, of course: politely and with much bowing and apologizing, but firmly. So for your own visit, make sure to show up early. Even then, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to see everything it has to offer.

Location on our Map
Miraikan – Website

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June 11, 2014 at 2:30 pm Comment (1)

Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum

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There was a time when one could see the entirety of Tokyo, or Edo as it was then known, from atop Atago Hill. Today the view is obscured by a wall of skyscrapers, but climbing the steep hill is still worth the effort, thanks to the presence of the Atago Shrine and the adjacent NHK Broadcast Museum.

Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum

I’m not a religious person at all, and not affiliated with any sort of church. However, if there were some sort of Global Anti-Atheism Law which forced me to choose a religion or die, Shintō would be a contender. I decided this while strolling through the gardens of the Atago Shrine. All I’d have to do is occasionally visit a beautiful park like this, wash my hands, and clap a couple times? I might already be a convert!

Atago Shrine is nice enough to make anyone a believer. A tiny oasis of peace in the middle of the city, it’s the kind of place whose existence hardly seems possible. At the bottom of the stairs, there’s Tokyo, with its attendant traffic, noise, and stress. And at the top, another world. There are woods, fountains, guardian statues and, in the koi pond, hilariously frantic carp crawling over each other in pursuit of food.

Thanks to the view it once commanded, Atago Hill has seen its share of history. It was here that the Tokugawa Shogunate peacefully surrendered to the Meiji Empire. The looming war was likely unwinnable, and looking out over his threatened city prompted the shogun to raise the white flag. “Honor in the face of defeat” would prove a popular mantra at Atago. After Japan’s capitulation in World War II, ten military commanders chose the hill as the site for a ritual suicide.

Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum

Having finished up at the shrine, we turned our attention to a more modern religion: television. NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Corporation, runs a free museum in the building where the country’s first television broadcasts went out. Spread across four floors and focusing on the early days of the technology, it was more entertaining than we expected it to be, with interactive displays and frequent appearances by Domo, NHK’s lovable mascot.

Locations on our Map: Atago Shrine | NHK Broadcasting Museum

Get Your Own Domo-Kun Mascot

Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
Atago Hill and the NHK Broadcast Museum
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May 18, 2014 at 11:29 am Comments (2)

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