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Chilling with the Cool Kids of Shimokita

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The good-looking older cousin of Harajuku, Shimokitazawa is leaning against the wall, smoking and watching bemusedly as the crowds swarm around the cute kid dressed in cosplay. He shakes his head, crushes his cigarette butt under the heel of his leather boot, and heads into the record shop. Harajuku might be more popular, but all the cool kids prefer Shimokita.

Shimokita

Part of the reason Shimokitazawa flies under the radar (if anything in Tokyo can be said to “fly under the radar”), is that it’s outside of the city center. It’s not connected to the Tokyo Metro or Oedo lines, which makes it just troublesome enough to discourage the throngs, but not a real inconvenience. You have to switch trains at Shibuya, but then it’s only a couple stops farther. Easy enough.

Shimokita is known for its indie vibe. Music shops line the street, along with bars, cheap eateries, and second-hand clothing stores. We aren’t normally big shoppers, but Shimokita was pressing all of our buttons. Old toys from the 1980s? There’s a shop for that. Awesome indie music from both Japan and the States? Right over here. Retro t-shirts which don’t look too retro? Shimokita has you covered. I felt cooler just being there.

We had only planned to grab lunch, but ended up spending most of the afternoon in Shimokita. It’s just a fun place to be. If we were moving to Tokyo for good, this neighborhood would be the first place we’d look for apartments.

Location of Shimokitazawa on our Map

Weird Gadgets From Japan

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July 7, 2014 at 12:41 pm Comment (1)

The Yomiuri Giants & Tokyo Dome City

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The Yomiuri Giants are the the New York Yankees of Japan. You can love them or hate them, but ambivalence is not allowed. They’re by far the richest and most successful team in Japanese baseball, with 22 titles under their belts. (The Saitama Seibu Lions are in second place with 13.) We took a trip to the Tokyo Dome to see the team in action.

Before the game started, we had a couple hours to kill. Luckily, Tokyo Dome City is a great place to kill time. An entire entertainment complex has sprung up around the stadium, with arcades, roller coasters, bars, restaurants, a mall, and even a hotel occupying a towering 47-story skyscraper. We went to the top of this building for a view over the dome, and then stopped by the arcade to challenge each other to a fierce match of video game pogo-jumping.

But the game was about to start, so we raced over to the 7-11 to stock up on beer and snacks — the ability to bring in your own supplies remains my favorite aspect of baseball in both Japan and Korea. The regular seats were all sold out, so we bought standing-room-only tickets, but I wasn’t too bothered… at least the stadium would be full, in stark contrast to the Swallows game we’d seen in April. But it turns out that standing-room in the Tokyo Dome is not good. There are only certain areas in which you’re allowed to stay, and the best spots are reserved by groups who have come in early and laid down their mats.

So we couldn’t see much. We maneuvered into an uncomfortable position behind the first-base line and, from our tiptoes, were able to catch some of the action. The Giants got off to a horrible start, dropping three runs in the first inning, and the crowd wasn’t exactly jubilant. Between each inning, we moved to a different spot, but never found a place which afforded a decent view. I don’t like leaving a match early, but the standing-room tickets had been half-price, so I felt justified in going home at the halfway point. The Giants ended up losing 7-2.

As a stadium, the Tokyo Dome leaves a lot to be desired. Baseball is meant to be seen outside, and being indoors ruins the atmosphere. That said, we’d have had more fun if we had planned properly and gotten actual seats. And the entertainment complex of Tokyo Dome City is certainly worth some time, even if you’re not going to the game. Overall, we enjoyed everything about the evening, except actually watching baseball.

Location of the Tokyo Dome on our Map

Great Gifts From The Japan

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July 5, 2014 at 11:11 am Comments (2)

The Jimbocho Book District & Crime Museum

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If you like books, you’re going to love the neighborhood of Jimbocho. Hundreds of new and used bookshops line the streets of this district, dedicated to everything from manga to art, architecture, fashion and travel. The majority of the books are in Japanese, but there are plenty of foreign titles, especially in English and German. Even if you’re not in the mood to buy, just browsing can make for an entertaining afternoon. But there’s almost no way that you’re going to walk out of Jimbocho empty-handed.

Jimbocho Book District & Crime Museum

I first visited Jimbocho while Jürgen was out of town on a photography job. There could hardly be a better place to distract someone who’s feeling lonely. I spent all afternoon poking around shelves packed with used English books. I flipped through some pervy anime titles and found mint-condition copies of Sports Illustrated from the 1960s. I went up to the second floor of a shop specializing in rare tomes, and lost track of time paging through antiquated travel books with names like The War for Quito and The Empire of Japon (which is apparently how we spelled it back then).

Later, I sat down in the Schwarzwald Cafe to pore over my new purchase: a book about sumo wrestling, written in 1950. Found across from the bizarre silver-egg of the Jimbocho Theater, the Schwarzwald has a wall covered in cuckoo clocks and excellent espresso. Very cute and comfortable, but the German-themed cafe reminded me of Jürgen. Oh, that’s right. I was supposed to be feeling lonely, not having such a fun day out by myself.

Once Jürgen was back in town, we made a return trip. I had talked up Jimbocho, going on and on about the photogenic old bookshops, the narrow alleys, fun cafes and the restaurants. It can be dangerous to set such high expectations, but there was no need to worry in the case of Jimbocho. I knew he would love it, and he did.

Jimbocho Book District & Crime Museum

On the campus of the Meiji University, to the north of Jimbocho, we found a free museum in the basement of the Academy Common. It’s mostly dedicated to the university itself, but includes a permanent exhibit about crime and punishment in the Edo era. The torture and execution devices on display include an iron maiden and a guillotine, along with even more vile equipment. For me, the worst was a pole around which a criminal would be tied, in a kneeling position. Heavy stone slabs would be placed atop his thighs, one-by-one, until his legs had been properly crushed.

Crime didn’t pay in Edo. I’m firmly anti-torture, but even I can admit that the threat of leg-crushing must have been an effective deterrent. This was a fascinating and evil way to end our excursion to Jimbocho, which had immediately become one of our favorite Tokyo neighborhoods.

Locations on our Map: Jimbocho Station | Schwarzwald Cafe | Meiji University Museum

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July 5, 2014 at 9:59 am Comments (0)

Komagome and the Rikugi-en Gardens

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A pleasant and almost entirely-overlooked neighborhood in the north of the city, Komagome is defined by narrow alleys lined with shops and restaurants, and is home to one of Tokyo’s best gardens: the Rikugi-en, originally built at the end of the seventeenth century.

Komagome and the Rikugi-en Gardens

We got off the train at Komagome Station with low expectations, which were quickly confirmed. There simply isn’t much here. But it’s an agreeable kind of nothingness. The streets are pedestrian and unpretentious, with shops that are interesting without being touristy. And the few people walking about are definitely locals.

After doing some shopping (I found an odds-and-ends shop selling cheap origami paper), we made our way to the Rikugi-en Gardens. It seems to be a popular place, particularly with older Japanese people meeting for a day in the park. I later learned that “Rikugi-en” translates to the “Garden of the Six Principles of Poetry”… which… first of all, how can such a short name can have such a complicated meaning? And second: that’s the weirdest name for a garden I’ve ever heard.

With its large pond, trees, hills and a circular path that leads around the grounds, the Rikugi-en was easily among the most lovely parks we saw in Tokyo. “Garden of the Six Principles of Poetry” is interesting, but if I were in charge, its name would be “Pretty Garden You So Pretty.”

Locations on our Map: Komagome Station | Rikugi-en

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July 3, 2014 at 7:25 am Comments (0)

The Skyscrapers of Shinjuku

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Although it’s considered Western Tokyo, Shinjuku can legitimately claim to be the new center of the city. Shinjuku Station is busier than Tokyo Station, serving nearly four million passengers a day. The city government has moved here, and Shinjuku boasts not only Tokyo’s most infamous entertainment district, but most of its tallest skyscrapers.

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Shinjuku Station is easily the busiest train station in the world. It serves four separate railway companies and its labyrinth of underground passageways is bewildering, almost impossible to navigate. One day, having decided to tour the neighborhood’s skyscrapers, we had been careful to follow signs for Exit A2. After a lengthy underground odyssey, we emerged into the daylight and realized that we were at the wrong exit A2; there was another with the same name on the other side of the station, administered by a different company. We felt stupid, until learning that Shinjuku Station has over 200 exits. Yeah, there are going to be a few mix-ups.

Eventually, we found our way to the western side of Shinjuku and began our introductory course to some of Tokyo’s largest buildings. Between the station and Shinjuku Central Park, the skyscrapers are packed tightly together, one after the other. Many of them have free observation decks, although not all are accessible to visitors. We were stopped at the door of the Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower, which has won architectural awards and is one of Tokyo’s most distinctive buildings. Three universities are housed inside, and the building’s cocoon shape is meant to symbolize the nurturing of the students within.

To get a view of the Cocoon, we ascended to the top of the neighboring Shinjuku Center Building, which was built in 1979. We also scaled the nearby Shinjuku Nomura, Mitsui and Sumitomo skyscrapers, each of which offered a slightly different perspective over the neighborhood. Our favorite building happened to be the smallest we entered. The Shinjuku NS is only 30 stories tall, but has a glass elevator on its corner and a hollow atrium with a hypnotizing water-clock designed by Seiko hanging on the wall.

We now made our way to the Metropolitan Government Office, built in 1991 by Japanese star architect Kenzo Tange. Featuring two towers that stretch up to 242 meters and a facade inspired by the Notre Dame Cathedral, this has become one of Tokyo’s most emblematic buildings. Each of the towers has an observatory, and depending on when you’re visiting, one or both might be open. We ascended the southern tower, and enjoyed the best view we’d had all day.

Prominent in the foreground when looking out from the Metropolitan is the Park Tower, also designed by Tange. The three towers of this enormous building are unmistakable, lined up like brothers of ascending height. The Park Tower is most well-known as the setting for Sofia Coppolla’s Lost in Translation (a highly-praised film which Jürgen and I both hated for its ridiculous, borderline-racist treatment of the Japanese and for its fabulously rich and petulant protagonists.)

Despite our distaste for the film, we wanted to see the famous bar where Bill Murray’s character spent his nights. But as the elevator doors opened, we were met by uniformed hosts who apparently have the job of politely truncating such sight-seeing before it gets started. Annoying, but fair enough; we were dressed in t-shirts, wearing backpacks and probably sweating, so it was a good bet that we weren’t there for a fancy dinner. And it just gives us another reason to hate that stupid, overrated movie.

Locations on our Map: Cocoon Tower | Shinjuku NS | Metropolitan Government Office | Park Tower

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July 2, 2014 at 5:20 pm Comments (3)

The View from Roppongi Hills

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Built for a whopping four billion dollars, the mega-complex known as Roppongi Hills opened to the public in 2003. With museums, malls, theaters, parks, hotels, hundreds of stores and restaurants, along with some of the city’s most expensive apartments, Roppongi Hills would love to eat up several of your Tokyo days. We spent about an hour there.

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A view of the Tokyo Tower from Roppongi Hills

Until a construction tycoon named Minoru Mori decided to revitalize it with an ambitious development project, Roppongi had been a seedy neighborhood where young and/or shady people went to party and get blitzed. Actually, it still is. The first thing we saw here was an absolutely wasted woman attempting to climb into a cab. Sensing imminent disaster, we paused to watch. As if on cue, she stumbled and fell face-first onto the concrete curb. It looked awful, but she picked herself up without any visible damage, so we felt fine about laughing. This was at one in the afternoon, by the way.

It was a pratfall which set the tone for our visit to in Roppongi Hills. There’s something about the place we didn’t like. It’s too showy. Too fake. It’s both ritzy, and just below the surface, totally trashy. Roppongi Hills is a rich, drunk woman face-planting before getting into her cab.

With outdoor loudspeakers that blare late into the night, and a confusing maze of walkways which make navigation a nightmare, Roppongi Hills isn’t a favorite among its neighbors. Most horribly, a boy was crushed to death in the mall’s revolving doors because the safety sensors had been placed too high, and weren’t able to detect his presence. It was later revealed that the revolving doors had been a known safety risk, and had caused at least 32 accidents prior to the child’s death. This fact had been concealed from investigating authorities, and the ensuing scandal turned local opinion firmly against Roppongi Hills.

 View Roppongi Hills

So we were already antagonistic before arriving. We skipped past the high-end shopping opportunities, and marched straight toward the 54-story Mori Tower, through legs of a giant spider. Courtesy of French artist Louise Bourgeois, this outdoor sculpture looks neat, but its spindly, organic shape is completely out-of-place in sleek and angular Roppongi Hills. “Trying too hard,” I hissed at Jürgen. “And does her name have to literally be Bourgeois?”

Anyway, the 360° view from Mori Tower is renowned as one of the best in Tokyo. You can see the SkyTree in the north, the Landmark Tower way down south in Yokohama, and even Mount Fuji on a clear day. Usually, you can pay extra to go onto the outdoor helipad for an even higher view, but the wind was too strong during our visit. That was fine by me, because it allowed us more time to enjoy happy hour at the bar.

Apart from our visit to the tower, we paid short shrift to the rest of Roppongi Hills. The museum at the top of the Mori Tower looked interesting, but was overly expensive, and we didn’t have any desire to wander through the mall. But such indifference seems to be more an exception than a rule. Roppongi Hills has become a bonafide Tokyo tourist attraction, drawing 26 million visitors in its first six months, each of whom spend an average of $100. That’s impressive, and despite our own misgivings about the complex, it’s probably worth a look.

Location on our Map

Great Hotels In Tokyo

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June 29, 2014 at 11:18 am Comments (0)

In and Around Tokyo Midtown

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It surely won’t keep the title for long but the tallest habitable building in Tokyo is currently the Midtown Tower, part of the Tokyo Midtown complex in Akasaka. We spent a day checking out the sights around Midtown, including the National Art Center and the tranquil Nogi Shrine.

Midtown Tokyo

Built in 2007 for over three billion dollars, the mixed-use Tokyo Midtown complex provides office space for leading firms like Xerox, Cisco and Yahoo! Japan, as well as residential apartments for (it seems safe to assume) the ultra-rich. In addition, it’s home to the five-story Galleria Mall, the Suntory Museum of Art and Issey Miyake’s 21_21 Design Sight workshop.

We spent a long time inside the Galleria Mall, walking into a number of shops… nothing which we could afford, of course, but there was some neat stuff. Along with stores selling clothing and household furnishings, there’s a vinoteca dedicated to the wines of Frances Ford Coppola. Even though we couldn’t shop, it was fun to be around such luxury, and one of Midtown’s best attractions is entirely free. Out back, in the shadow of the massive tower, is a gently sloping park that has soft grass, upon which hundreds of people were lying.

Midtown Tokyo

After resting in the park, we walked over to the nearby National Art Center, which also opened in 2007 and is among the largest art halls in Japan, with an ever-changing lineup of exhibits in its many rooms. But we were less interested in the art, than the architecture. The building, designed by Kisho Kurokawa, has a tilted, wave-shaped glass facade and an interior architecture that features huge, upside-down cones.

Midtown Tokyo

Further north along Gaien-Higashi-Dori, we came upon the Nogi Shrine. This is the former home of General Nogi, who served Emperor Meiji throughout his reign. The General had an illustrious career, with victories against both the Chinese and Russians, but today he’s most well-known for a demonstration of ultimate loyalty. A couple days following the death of the Emperor, both Nogi and his wife committed suicide in their home; she by throat-slitting, he by seppuku.

It’s a grisly story (and one I don’t find particularly “honorable”), but today the shrine and its adjoining park make for a peaceful escape from the noise and tawdry luxury of the upscale neighborhood surrounding it.

Locations on our Map: Tokyo Midtown | National Art Center | Nogi Shrine

Travel Insurance For your Tokyo Trip

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June 29, 2014 at 7:45 am Comments (0)

The Nikolai Cathedral in Kanda

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In many other countries, the Nikolai Cathedral would hardly merit a second glance. But in Japan, the Byzantine-style construction is definitely noteworthy. Built in 1891, this Russian Orthodox church set atop a hill in Kanda is one of Tokyo’s stranger sights, just because it exists at all.

Nikolai Cathedral in Kanda

So what exactly is a Russian Orthodox Church doing in one of the choicest locations in central Tokyo? The story dates to the 1860s, when Ivan Dimitrovich Kasatkin decided to bring his religion from Russia to the eastern islands of Japan. After landing in Hokkaido, he set about learning the language and had soon converted three people to Christianity, one of whom was both a samurai and Shinto priest. The future Saint Nikolai didn’t stop there. Moving to Tokyo, he snapped up this property in Kanda and erected his church. By the time he died in 1912, he had managed to convert about 40,000 people.

We visited the church during a walk around the neighborhood of Kanda. You can step inside, but you can’t walk around freely. Neither the architecture nor interior artwork are all that memorable, and the stunning view the cathedral must have once commanded has long been obscured by neighboring skyscrapers.

Still, it’s fun to see a building so discordant with its surroundings, and a visit to the Nikolai Cathedral provides a convenient excuse to check out the rest of Kanda, which is packed with great restaurants and shops.

Location on our Map

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June 23, 2014 at 10:44 am Comments (0)

Akihabara

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The great Mecca of otaku culture, Akihabara is home to innumerable shops dedicated to anime, manga, cosplay, trading cards and collectible figurines. The world’s first Maid Cafe was established here, and you can also find cheap electronics stores, grand arcades, multi-story hobby malls, and much, much more. It sounds wonderful, so we were surprised when we didn’t like Akihabara all that much.

Akihabara Tokyo

Akihabara was Tokyo’s original “Electronics Town,” where, in the post-war years, people could buy the newest household gadgets. It was also the first area in the city to embrace computing and so it became known as a place with a futuristic outlook. The young, geeky gamers of Tokyo congregated in Akihabara’s bars and cafes, and it developed into a natural center of otaku culture.

Otaku is a tricky term, which I’m not sure I fully understand. Basically, it’s the Japanese version of “ultra-geek,” referring to people who are maniacally obsessed with things like manga or cosplay. Like “geek,” otaku is a traditionally negative term which has come to be embraced by its community. Today, a large percentage of Japanese self-identify as otaku.

Whatever it is, we saw otaku culture at its strongest in Akihabara. We walked through the arcades where guys were playing insane games involving digitally-imprinted playing cards. We squeezed into stores to look at ridiculously expensive anime figurines, and marveled over the people actually buying them. We explored comic shops which spanned seven floors. We ambled down the streets, dazed, politely shaking our heads to every maid that tried to win our attention. Far quicker than than we had anticipated, we’d had enough: Akihabara is not for us.

I don’t know what went wrong! I consider myself rather geeky… I enjoy the occasional role-playing game, and could list off a dozen members of the Green Lantern Corps without blinking. But I’ve always kept my geekiest impulses under control, afraid what might happen should the flood gates open. In Akihabara, confronted with truly unrestrained geekery, I had solid proof that moderation is the best policy.

Akihabara Tokyo

There’s something cute about a maid cafe. There’s nothing cute about dozens of maid cafes. And there’s something downright creepy about hundreds of young girls dressed in suggestive costumes standing around on street corners. Same with the collectible card stores… who doesn’t like card games? They’re fun. But try visiting one of these shops where literally hundreds of various Magic-type card-battle games are sold. Where people will spend a fortune on a single rare card. There’s little joy to be found here, just obsession. After Akihabara, I wanted to grab a fishing pole and go sit on a lake. I wanted to spit in the dirt, and rub mud on my face.

Still, it’s a crazy area and maybe on a different day we would have enjoyed it. At any rate, Akihabara is worth seeing, and if you’re in the market for cheap electronics (or comics or games or maids), it’s probably the best place to go in Tokyo.

Location of Akihabara Station on our Map

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June 22, 2014 at 3:49 pm Comments (0)

Our Favorite Shibuya Sights

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We spent many entertaining evenings in Shibuya, which has become one of the most exciting areas in Tokyo. There are so many bars, shops and things to do here, that it would be hopeless to attempt listing them all. But here were a few of our personal favorites.

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Cat Street

Perhaps the best way to approach Shibuya is along Cat Street, by way of Omotesando. This curvy lane follows the old path of the Shibuya River, and brings you past loads of cool designer stores, vintage clothing shops, and cozy cafes. It’s is one of the most popular areas among the young and hip of Tokyo, and serves as a relatively laid-back introduction to the craziness you’re about to experience in Shibuya. [Location]

Shibuya Goat Cafe
Sakuragaoka – Goat Cafe

Found on the quieter southern side of the tracks, Sakuragaoka has won fame not for its food or drinks, but for its doormen. In a cage outside the cafe are two braying goats. Sweet-tempered Sakura is white, while boisterous Chocolat has a brown coat. You can pet Sakura without fear, but take care if attempting to touch Chocolat; that feisty beast will head-bash anyone who gets too close. The goats are fun, but our favorite part of this cafe was its familiar atmosphere and excellent food. [Location]

Photo Boxes

Yes, fine, the most important thing is inner beauty. Blah blah, now shut up and get out of the way, so I can get inside this photo box and show you what real beauty looks like.

You can find Fashion Photo Booths all over Tokyo, but for some reason it took a trip to Shibuya before we felt brave (or drunk) enough to step inside one. Want freakishly huge eyes like a Disney character? Want smoother, lighter skin like the finest porcelain? Want your wrinkles to vanish along with the last of your self-regard? Then these photo booths are for you. Results can range from terrifying to hilarious. But probably not beautiful.

Uobei  Automated Sushi Restaurant
Uobei Automated Sushi

Sit down in front of a terminal at Uobei, and scroll through the options. Tuna nigiri, that sounds good. Salmon with mayo? Yes please. And a tempura shrimp roll for only ¥108? That’s crazy, I’ll take it. Selections made, you press “go.” A couple minutes later, a tray with three plates zips out along a magnetic belt, stationing itself in front of you. You grab the plates, press a button and zip, the tray flies off, back in the opposite direction.

Ostensibly prepared by humans, the sushi at Uobei is delicious and fun, but will make connoisseurs turn up their nose. One offering, for example, is cheeseburger sushi. Yes, we ordered it. Yes, we loved it. Though Uobei forces you to miss out on the human engagement which makes experiencing a foreign culture so rewarding, sometimes it’s nice to just look at color pictures of food, press buttons, and eat in blissful peace, no talking required. [Location]

Karaoke Tokyo

(With our friends from Chic Soufflé and Not Hemingway’s Spain)

Karaoke

You’re in Tokyo, so you’re doing karaoke. No, that’s not a suggestion, nor is it a threat. Just a simple declaration of fact. You’re in Tokyo, so you’re doing karaoke. Grab your friends, have some drinks, and relax. This isn’t American-style karaoke, where you’re asked to bleat in front of a huge crowd of strangers. In Japan, you rent a room, and the only people who will ever hear you are those you trust.

We thought that in Shibuya, karaoke might be too expensive, or that we’d have to wait in a long line. But in fact, this turned out to be the best place for it. There are a lot of halls, and maybe because they’re forced to compete, they’re cheap. You normally rent a room for an hour at a time, and the price includes all the drinks you want. The machines can be switched to English, and the song selection is excellent. Kanye West? Guns n’ Roses? System of a Down? 99 Luftballons? Shibuya’s karaoke halls have you covered. But as for your friends’ ears… they’ll have to cover those, themselves.

Crazy Shibuya
Maidreamin’

We sat down at our table in this below-ground restaurant in Shibuya, and were instantly made dizzy by the pixellated decor. Maidreamin’ is a cafe that takes its inspiration from the 8-bit world of Mario Brothers. I don’t remember any flirty french maids in the video game, but perhaps they were on Level Eleven.

We leaned back in our chairs and allowed ourselves to be entertained by a super-sweet cadre of hostesses who brought us food, served us beer, blew us kisses, taught us cutesy-pie songs, and even danced to ear-splitting J-Pop on a tiny stage in the middle of the cafe. It was a bizarre, very Tokyo-ish evening out and even though our personal tastes run more toward butlers, we had a great time. [Location]

Tokyo Tower Framed Photo

More Photos from Cat Street
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
Cat Street Tokyo
More Photos from the Goat Cafe
Shibuya Goat Cafe
Shibuya Goat Cafe
Shibuya Goat Cafe
Shibuya Goat Cafe
Another Beauty Box Photo
Beauty Booth
More Photos from Uobei Automated Sushi Restaurant
Uobei  Automated Sushi Restaurant
Uobei  Automated Sushi Restaurant
Uobei  Automated Sushi Restaurant
Uobei  Automated Sushi Restaurant
Uobei  Automated Sushi Restaurant
Uobei  Automated Sushi Restaurant
A Couple More Karaoke Photos
Karaoke Tokyo
Karaoke Tokyo
Another Pic from Maidreamin’
Crazy Shibuya
Random Shibuya Pictures
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
Crazy Shibuya
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June 20, 2014 at 12:04 pm Comments (2)

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Chilling with the Cool Kids of Shimokita The good-looking older cousin of Harajuku, Shimokitazawa is leaning against the wall, smoking and watching bemusedly as the crowds swarm around the cute kid dressed in cosplay. He shakes his head, crushes his cigarette butt under the heel of his leather boot, and heads into the record shop. Harajuku might be more popular, but all the cool kids prefer Shimokita.
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